......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
On assignment for GEO Magazine.

On assignment for GEO Magazine.

Sheep at Stanage Edge in the Peak District. Jane Austen refers to there being “no finer county in England than Derbyshire”, and features “all the the celebrated beauties of Chatsworth, Dovedale and the Peaks”.

 Visitors watching the seascape at the harbour wall, known as "The Cobb" in Lyme Regis. The wall features in Jane Austen's novel Persuasion as well as in The French Lieutenant's Woman, a novel by British writer John Fowles.

Visitors watching the seascape at the harbour wall, known as "The Cobb" in Lyme Regis. The wall features in Jane Austen's novel Persuasion as well as in The French Lieutenant's Woman, a novel by British writer John Fowles.

 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. 

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. 

 Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

 A traditional Devonshire home in Evershot. A famous rector, George Crabbe (1783 to 1789), lived in this village. He was regarded as a great national poet and was also a favourite with Jane Austen. 

A traditional Devonshire home in Evershot. A famous rector, George Crabbe (1783 to 1789), lived in this village. He was regarded as a great national poet and was also a favourite with Jane Austen. 

 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade.

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade.

 An English country cottage inside the Dartmoor National Park in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

An English country cottage inside the Dartmoor National Park in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

 Tourists visiting the gardens at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The estate is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire and has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549. It stands on the east bank of the River Derwent and looks across to the low hills that divide the Derwent and Wye valleys. The house, set in expansive parkland and backed by wooded, rocky hills rising to heather moorland, contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculptures, books and other artefacts. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom's favourite country house several times.

Tourists visiting the gardens at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The estate is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire and has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549. It stands on the east bank of the River Derwent and looks across to the low hills that divide the Derwent and Wye valleys. The house, set in expansive parkland and backed by wooded, rocky hills rising to heather moorland, contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculptures, books and other artefacts. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom's favourite country house several times.

 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. It started at the historic Georgian Assembly Rooms, where a new world record was successfully set for the largest gathering of people dressed in Regency costume before it continued through to some of the most iconic places of Bath before it ended in the Parade Gardens.

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. It started at the historic Georgian Assembly Rooms, where a new world record was successfully set for the largest gathering of people dressed in Regency costume before it continued through to some of the most iconic places of Bath before it ended in the Parade Gardens.

 Library inside Chatsworth House. The library has some of the oldest books in the world in its collection. In the film, Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell.

Library inside Chatsworth House. The library has some of the oldest books in the world in its collection. In the film, Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell.

 An English cottage in Bath. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.

An English cottage in Bath. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.

 Life inside the village of Lustleigh set in the  Dartmoor National Park. The May Day celebrations are the biggest event of the year for the village, with a carnival procession, maypole dancing, and crowning of the May Queen. The granite boulder where the ceremony takes place has inscribed upon it the names of all the May Queens up to the beginning of the Second World War when the event was suspended. In 1954, the celebrations were again revived and moved to the Town Orchard where the May Queen's throne was erected on a rock.

Life inside the village of Lustleigh set in the  Dartmoor National Park. The May Day celebrations are the biggest event of the year for the village, with a carnival procession, maypole dancing, and crowning of the May Queen. The granite boulder where the ceremony takes place has inscribed upon it the names of all the May Queens up to the beginning of the Second World War when the event was suspended. In 1954, the celebrations were again revived and moved to the Town Orchard where the May Queen's throne was erected on a rock.

 Kensington Gardens, where Elinor Dashwood met with the gossiping and indiscreet Nancy Steele, on a beautiful Spring Sunday. Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. The park covers an area of 111 hectares.

Kensington Gardens, where Elinor Dashwood met with the gossiping and indiscreet Nancy Steele, on a beautiful Spring Sunday. Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. The park covers an area of 111 hectares.

 Students walking home past the Bath Abbey. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.

Students walking home past the Bath Abbey. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.

 As today, Bond Street was the most fashionable shopping area of Regency London. During that period the best dress-makers and tailors, jewellers and boot-makers, tobacconists and haberdashers all had well-appointed shops along that street.

As today, Bond Street was the most fashionable shopping area of Regency London. During that period the best dress-makers and tailors, jewellers and boot-makers, tobacconists and haberdashers all had well-appointed shops along that street.

 In the film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The Sculpture Gallery was used in the scene where Lizzie Bennet sees the bust of Mr Darcy, and his housekeeper describes his many good qualities. 

In the film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The Sculpture Gallery was used in the scene where Lizzie Bennet sees the bust of Mr Darcy, and his housekeeper describes his many good qualities. 

 A local woman spends the day out searching for fossils with her dogs by the sea cliffs in Chartmouth. The area is noted for the fossils found in the cliffs and beaches, which are part of the Heritage Coast—known commercially as the Jurassic Coast—a World Heritage Site. Furthermore, Jane Austen is known to have been a frequent visitor describing it as a place of “high grounds and extensive sweeps of country, and, still more, its sweet retired bay, beached by dark cliffs where fragments of low rock among the sands make it the happiest spot for watching the flow of the tide; for sitting in unwearied contemplation”.   

A local woman spends the day out searching for fossils with her dogs by the sea cliffs in Chartmouth. The area is noted for the fossils found in the cliffs and beaches, which are part of the Heritage Coast—known commercially as the Jurassic Coast—a World Heritage Site. Furthermore, Jane Austen is known to have been a frequent visitor describing it as a place of “high grounds and extensive sweeps of country, and, still more, its sweet retired bay, beached by dark cliffs where fragments of low rock among the sands make it the happiest spot for watching the flow of the tide; for sitting in unwearied contemplation”.

 

 A shop in the Burlington Arcades in London. Jane visited London as early as 1796. Constance Hill writes in her 1901 book, Jane Austen: Her Homes and Her Friends: "We have mentioned her sleeping at an inn in Cork Street in 1796. Most of the coaches from the south and west of England set down their passengers, it seems, at the “White Horse Cellar” in Piccadilly, which stood near to the entrance of what is now the Burlington Arcade. Jane and her brothers, therefore, probably alighted here and they would find Cork Street, immediately behind the “White Horse Cellar,” a convenient place for their lodging."

A shop in the Burlington Arcades in London. Jane visited London as early as 1796. Constance Hill writes in her 1901 book, Jane Austen: Her Homes and Her Friends: "We have mentioned her sleeping at an inn in Cork Street in 1796. Most of the coaches from the south and west of England set down their passengers, it seems, at the “White Horse Cellar” in Piccadilly, which stood near to the entrance of what is now the Burlington Arcade. Jane and her brothers, therefore, probably alighted here and they would find Cork Street, immediately behind the “White Horse Cellar,” a convenient place for their lodging."

 The interior of St. Giles House, home of the Earls of Shaftesbury since 1651. Currently, it is the 12th Earl of Shaftesbury, Nick Ashley-Cooper, and his wife that live in the house. In recent years the house has been undergoing much needed renovation and repair after having stood empty for 50 years. The Earl, is slowly putting the house back together with the help of Edward Hurst an antique dealer and interior consultant.  He says: “It has been one of the most rewarding things I have ever worked on... We managed to hang onto a bit of the Miss Havisham quality… "

The interior of St. Giles House, home of the Earls of Shaftesbury since 1651. Currently, it is the 12th Earl of Shaftesbury, Nick Ashley-Cooper, and his wife that live in the house. In recent years the house has been undergoing much needed renovation and repair after having stood empty for 50 years. The Earl, is slowly putting the house back together with the help of Edward Hurst an antique dealer and interior consultant.

He says: “It has been one of the most rewarding things I have ever worked on... We managed to hang onto a bit of the Miss Havisham quality… "

 The Roaches, with Hen Cloud and Ramshaw Rocks, form a gritstone escarpment which marks the south-western edge of the Peak. It is an area very popular with walkers and rock climbers.

The Roaches, with Hen Cloud and Ramshaw Rocks, form a gritstone escarpment which marks the south-western edge of the Peak. It is an area very popular with walkers and rock climbers.

 A typical English country cottage in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

A typical English country cottage in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. The promenade was led by a group of redcoats through the city's most iconic streets.

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. The promenade was led by a group of redcoats through the city's most iconic streets.

 Tourists at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. Chatsworth House is a stately home in Derbyshire and the seat of the Duke of Devonshire. It has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549.

Tourists at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. Chatsworth House is a stately home in Derbyshire and the seat of the Duke of Devonshire. It has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549.

 A landscaped garden at the Summer Lodge, a Georgian listed hotel in the village of Evershot. The house was enlarged in 1893, using plans designed by Thomas Hardy himself, then a local architect as well as an author. A gate through a yew hedge leads to the steep main street of Evershot, a hamlet so unspoilt it has appeared in several Jane Austen films.

A landscaped garden at the Summer Lodge, a Georgian listed hotel in the village of Evershot. The house was enlarged in 1893, using plans designed by Thomas Hardy himself, then a local architect as well as an author. A gate through a yew hedge leads to the steep main street of Evershot, a hamlet so unspoilt it has appeared in several Jane Austen films.

 Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

 Landscape in Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

Landscape in Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

On assignment for GEO Magazine.

Sheep at Stanage Edge in the Peak District. Jane Austen refers to there being “no finer county in England than Derbyshire”, and features “all the the celebrated beauties of Chatsworth, Dovedale and the Peaks”.

Visitors watching the seascape at the harbour wall, known as "The Cobb" in Lyme Regis. The wall features in Jane Austen's novel Persuasion as well as in The French Lieutenant's Woman, a novel by British writer John Fowles.

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. 

Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

A traditional Devonshire home in Evershot. A famous rector, George Crabbe (1783 to 1789), lived in this village. He was regarded as a great national poet and was also a favourite with Jane Austen. 

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade.

An English country cottage inside the Dartmoor National Park in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

Tourists visiting the gardens at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The estate is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire and has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549. It stands on the east bank of the River Derwent and looks across to the low hills that divide the Derwent and Wye valleys. The house, set in expansive parkland and backed by wooded, rocky hills rising to heather moorland, contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculptures, books and other artefacts. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom's favourite country house several times.

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. It started at the historic Georgian Assembly Rooms, where a new world record was successfully set for the largest gathering of people dressed in Regency costume before it continued through to some of the most iconic places of Bath before it ended in the Parade Gardens.

Library inside Chatsworth House. The library has some of the oldest books in the world in its collection. In the film, Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell.

An English cottage in Bath. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.

Life inside the village of Lustleigh set in the  Dartmoor National Park. The May Day celebrations are the biggest event of the year for the village, with a carnival procession, maypole dancing, and crowning of the May Queen. The granite boulder where the ceremony takes place has inscribed upon it the names of all the May Queens up to the beginning of the Second World War when the event was suspended. In 1954, the celebrations were again revived and moved to the Town Orchard where the May Queen's throne was erected on a rock.

Kensington Gardens, where Elinor Dashwood met with the gossiping and indiscreet Nancy Steele, on a beautiful Spring Sunday. Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. The park covers an area of 111 hectares.

Students walking home past the Bath Abbey. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.

As today, Bond Street was the most fashionable shopping area of Regency London. During that period the best dress-makers and tailors, jewellers and boot-makers, tobacconists and haberdashers all had well-appointed shops along that street.

In the film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The Sculpture Gallery was used in the scene where Lizzie Bennet sees the bust of Mr Darcy, and his housekeeper describes his many good qualities. 

A local woman spends the day out searching for fossils with her dogs by the sea cliffs in Chartmouth. The area is noted for the fossils found in the cliffs and beaches, which are part of the Heritage Coast—known commercially as the Jurassic Coast—a World Heritage Site. Furthermore, Jane Austen is known to have been a frequent visitor describing it as a place of “high grounds and extensive sweeps of country, and, still more, its sweet retired bay, beached by dark cliffs where fragments of low rock among the sands make it the happiest spot for watching the flow of the tide; for sitting in unwearied contemplation”.

 

A shop in the Burlington Arcades in London. Jane visited London as early as 1796. Constance Hill writes in her 1901 book, Jane Austen: Her Homes and Her Friends: "We have mentioned her sleeping at an inn in Cork Street in 1796. Most of the coaches from the south and west of England set down their passengers, it seems, at the “White Horse Cellar” in Piccadilly, which stood near to the entrance of what is now the Burlington Arcade. Jane and her brothers, therefore, probably alighted here and they would find Cork Street, immediately behind the “White Horse Cellar,” a convenient place for their lodging."

The interior of St. Giles House, home of the Earls of Shaftesbury since 1651. Currently, it is the 12th Earl of Shaftesbury, Nick Ashley-Cooper, and his wife that live in the house. In recent years the house has been undergoing much needed renovation and repair after having stood empty for 50 years. The Earl, is slowly putting the house back together with the help of Edward Hurst an antique dealer and interior consultant.

He says: “It has been one of the most rewarding things I have ever worked on... We managed to hang onto a bit of the Miss Havisham quality… "

The Roaches, with Hen Cloud and Ramshaw Rocks, form a gritstone escarpment which marks the south-western edge of the Peak. It is an area very popular with walkers and rock climbers.

A typical English country cottage in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. The promenade was led by a group of redcoats through the city's most iconic streets.

Tourists at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. Chatsworth House is a stately home in Derbyshire and the seat of the Duke of Devonshire. It has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549.

A landscaped garden at the Summer Lodge, a Georgian listed hotel in the village of Evershot. The house was enlarged in 1893, using plans designed by Thomas Hardy himself, then a local architect as well as an author. A gate through a yew hedge leads to the steep main street of Evershot, a hamlet so unspoilt it has appeared in several Jane Austen films.

Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

Landscape in Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.

Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.

On assignment for GEO Magazine.
 Visitors watching the seascape at the harbour wall, known as "The Cobb" in Lyme Regis. The wall features in Jane Austen's novel Persuasion as well as in The French Lieutenant's Woman, a novel by British writer John Fowles.
 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. 
 Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.
 A traditional Devonshire home in Evershot. A famous rector, George Crabbe (1783 to 1789), lived in this village. He was regarded as a great national poet and was also a favourite with Jane Austen. 
 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade.
 An English country cottage inside the Dartmoor National Park in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.
 Tourists visiting the gardens at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The estate is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire and has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549. It stands on the east bank of the River Derwent and looks across to the low hills that divide the Derwent and Wye valleys. The house, set in expansive parkland and backed by wooded, rocky hills rising to heather moorland, contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculptures, books and other artefacts. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom's favourite country house several times.
 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. It started at the historic Georgian Assembly Rooms, where a new world record was successfully set for the largest gathering of people dressed in Regency costume before it continued through to some of the most iconic places of Bath before it ended in the Parade Gardens.
 Library inside Chatsworth House. The library has some of the oldest books in the world in its collection. In the film, Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell.
 An English cottage in Bath. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.
 Life inside the village of Lustleigh set in the  Dartmoor National Park. The May Day celebrations are the biggest event of the year for the village, with a carnival procession, maypole dancing, and crowning of the May Queen. The granite boulder where the ceremony takes place has inscribed upon it the names of all the May Queens up to the beginning of the Second World War when the event was suspended. In 1954, the celebrations were again revived and moved to the Town Orchard where the May Queen's throne was erected on a rock.
 Kensington Gardens, where Elinor Dashwood met with the gossiping and indiscreet Nancy Steele, on a beautiful Spring Sunday. Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. The park covers an area of 111 hectares.
 Students walking home past the Bath Abbey. Jane Austen knew Bath as a thriving spa resort, popular with fashionable society and from 1801 to 1806 it was her home.
 As today, Bond Street was the most fashionable shopping area of Regency London. During that period the best dress-makers and tailors, jewellers and boot-makers, tobacconists and haberdashers all had well-appointed shops along that street.
 In the film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. The Sculpture Gallery was used in the scene where Lizzie Bennet sees the bust of Mr Darcy, and his housekeeper describes his many good qualities. 
 A local woman spends the day out searching for fossils with her dogs by the sea cliffs in Chartmouth. The area is noted for the fossils found in the cliffs and beaches, which are part of the Heritage Coast—known commercially as the Jurassic Coast—a World Heritage Site. Furthermore, Jane Austen is known to have been a frequent visitor describing it as a place of “high grounds and extensive sweeps of country, and, still more, its sweet retired bay, beached by dark cliffs where fragments of low rock among the sands make it the happiest spot for watching the flow of the tide; for sitting in unwearied contemplation”.   
 A shop in the Burlington Arcades in London. Jane visited London as early as 1796. Constance Hill writes in her 1901 book, Jane Austen: Her Homes and Her Friends: "We have mentioned her sleeping at an inn in Cork Street in 1796. Most of the coaches from the south and west of England set down their passengers, it seems, at the “White Horse Cellar” in Piccadilly, which stood near to the entrance of what is now the Burlington Arcade. Jane and her brothers, therefore, probably alighted here and they would find Cork Street, immediately behind the “White Horse Cellar,” a convenient place for their lodging."
 The interior of St. Giles House, home of the Earls of Shaftesbury since 1651. Currently, it is the 12th Earl of Shaftesbury, Nick Ashley-Cooper, and his wife that live in the house. In recent years the house has been undergoing much needed renovation and repair after having stood empty for 50 years. The Earl, is slowly putting the house back together with the help of Edward Hurst an antique dealer and interior consultant.  He says: “It has been one of the most rewarding things I have ever worked on... We managed to hang onto a bit of the Miss Havisham quality… "
 The Roaches, with Hen Cloud and Ramshaw Rocks, form a gritstone escarpment which marks the south-western edge of the Peak. It is an area very popular with walkers and rock climbers.
 A typical English country cottage in Devon. This county has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.
 On Saturday, 15 Sept 2014, Bath stepped back in time to its Georgian heyday. The streets were full of Jane Austen enthusiasts dressed up in Regency costume for the Jane Austen Festival Grand Regency Costumed Promenade. The promenade was led by a group of redcoats through the city's most iconic streets.
 Tourists at Chatsworth House. In Pride and Prejudice, Chatsworth was used as Pemberley, the residence of Mr. Darcy. It is believed that Jane Austen actually based her idea of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel while in Bakewell. Chatsworth House is a stately home in Derbyshire and the seat of the Duke of Devonshire. It has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549.
 A landscaped garden at the Summer Lodge, a Georgian listed hotel in the village of Evershot. The house was enlarged in 1893, using plans designed by Thomas Hardy himself, then a local architect as well as an author. A gate through a yew hedge leads to the steep main street of Evershot, a hamlet so unspoilt it has appeared in several Jane Austen films.
 Wild ponies in Bellever Forest at the Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.
 Landscape in Dartmoor National Park. Devon has provided inspiration for a host of literary greats down the centuries. Many of them lived in Devon; some stayed here for a time; and others holidayed in the county.  Writers such as Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie, Thomas Hardy, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle, RD Blackmore, Henry Williamson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - to name only a few - all have links in one way or another with Devon.